Tiny Homes for the Homefree

In the days after I talked with my friends about using self-care to enhance their creativity, I saw them internalize the message by eating more fresh foods, meditating as a group, and taking an afternoon off to swim in the Yuba river. In just a short time they were vibrant and joyous as if they had never fallen into a slump; more importantly, after they dedicated themselves to self-care, they accessed crucial, nuanced elements that brought completion to several songs. When they played me a few tracks I was spellbound by the gravity and emotion of the music; one song even brought me to tears.

Witnessing my friends gain immediate, fruitful vitality and accomplishment spurred me to nourish my inner artist with greater depth.

I began by writing a list of fun, compelling, and invigorating activities to feed my soul and refill my creative well (as Julia Cameron would call it). To my surprise, as I reviewed my list, I found many hobbies like gardening, juicing and playing piano that I couldn’t do often — or at all — while living on the road. I realized I missed them like long-lost friends.

I turned my inner eye to the loneliness, uncertainty, and aimlessness I’ve felt in the past year from living homefree. I thought of the time and energy I’ve lost from worrying about where I would go, which friend could host me, where to write, and how I could shift the moving parts to make it happen.

For the last few weeks I’ve taken a break from constant travel and have stayed in a cottage on my aunt and uncle’s property. It’s the longest I have stayed in any one place for the last year! But could I call it home?

Despite the difficulties of homelessness, I love the thrill and adventure of transience. I love the way it’s forced me to grow and stabilize in the present moment. Settling into one place felt like it could end my carefree, rolling stone lifestyle.

But what does my inner artist want?

I walked out of the cottage to a nearby pond. Standing beneath pines amongst lupine I felt the beauty of the landscape seep into my bones. I breathed deeply listening to the freedom of birds singing from the trees. Still water reflected clouds, and looking into its depths, my mind became quiet.

Wouldn’t it be refreshing to have a home again? I thought of all the comforts a home would provide: a grounding place to go back to; a sacred space for meditation, prayer and writing; my own bed. I love domestic activities; they enrich my life and nourish me. With a home I could cuddle my cat, play my piano, plant some flowers, and create a space and momentum for words to flow. A home would make self-care easier and diminish my greatest stressors. It didn’t have to mean an end to my glamsient ways; if I wanted, it could make glamsienting more sustainable.

I turned back to look at the cottage — yes, I would make this my artist’s home.

Clouds Reflected in the Pond

The Glam in Glamsient

A few nights ago I met with a group of friends in Nevada City, CA at Three Forks Bakery and Brewery. The five of us sat at a large, sturdy wooden table; our group consisted of three musicians, a photographer, and me (a writer). We spoke of art and politics, festivals and hiking, our latest projects and our recent travels. The restaurant buzzed around us. 

After a round of drinks, we ate together in my favorite manner — family style. Between the five of us, we enjoyed a multitude of salads, small plates, pizzas and desserts all made, for the most part, with locally sourced, organic ingredients. Collectively, we indulged in a wide array of the eclectic menu; choosing independently, we brought an assortment of tastes to the table. We took each other in unexpected and unplanned directions, and the result surprised even us! Each dish, distinct and flavorful, brought new notes to our palette. We all loved every dish we tried — and that’s not an exaggeration!

Life within a community is rich. We try new things we never would have tried on our own; the people around us bring their unique flavor and tastes to the table. We can have more and try more through our networks. Sharing our joy and passion multiplies our happiness; sharing our gifts and talents increases our ability.

So it is living a glamsient life. In the beginning, Linney introduced me to the glamsient lifestyle and my friend, James, made it possible; to keep the glamsient times rolling, I have created work and trade relationships with my friends and family for money, housing, and furthering my career as a writer — something I never did when I lived an insular 9-5 life. 

Immersing in community is a vibrant effect of the glamsient life. Now I am more connected in mutually beneficial relationships with the people I care about and I can focus more on my art. Travel and luxury are amazing facets of the glamsient life, but a stronger sense of community is the true glamor in glamsient — I feel more inspired, vital, and productive than ever before. Just as the family style dinner at Three Forks allowed me to dive deeper into their menu than I would have on my own, living more fully in my community has taken me in new directions and added new meaning to my life. 

I am truly grateful for my community!

By the way, if you visit Three Forks in Nevada City, try one (all!) of my favorites: the pozole, the Aw Snap and If I Only Had a Grain salads, the bacon-date bread, and the lemon tart. Enjoy!
 

The Aw Snap Salad; photo courtesy of Three Forks Facebook; facebook.com/ThreeForksNC